The History & Purpose of Education | Henry Van Dyke

August 16, 2018
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Listen to episode 292 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The History & Purpose of Education | Henry Van Dyke. Edited and adapted from The School of Life.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. If you have been enjoying our podcast, we would be much obliged if you could help us spread the word by sharing one of our podcasts on your Facebook page, LinkedIn, or Twitter. Or the old-fashioned way of mentioning us to your friends when hanging out together. Thanks in advance.

Now, on to today’s reading, which was edited and adapted from “The School of Life” by Henry Van Dyke, published in 1905.

Life itself is the great school. Facts are teachers. Experiences are lessons. Friends are guides. Work is a master. Love is an interpreter. Teaching itself is a method of learning. Joy carries a divining rod and discovers fountains. Sorrow is an astronomer and shows us the stars. What I have lived I really know, and what I really know I partly own; and so beginning with what I know and what I own, I move through my curriculum, elective and required, gaining nothing but what I learn, at once instructed by every duty and every pleasure.

It is a mistake to say, "Today education ends, tomorrow life begins." The process is continuous: the idea turns into the thought, the thought into the action, the action into the character. When the mulberry seed falls into the ground and germinates, it begins to be transformed into silk. This view of life as a process of education was held by the Greeks and the Hebrews — the two races in whose deep hearts the stream of Western progress takes its rise, the two great races whose energy of spirit and strength of self-restraint have kept the modern world afloat.

For the Greeks, the dominant idea was the unfolding of reason, the clarifying of the powers of thought and imagination. The ideal person was one who saw things as they are, and understood their nature, and felt beauty, and followed truth....

William Shakespeare | Quotes & Wisdom | Plays

August 14, 2018
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Listen to episode 291 of the Inspirational Living podcast: William Shakespeare | Quotes & Wisdom | Plays. Edited and adapted from the works of Shakespeare.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. To get our podcast in fireside chat form, which you can pull up on your smart TV, subscribe to our YouTube Channel. Visit LivingHour.org/youtube. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from the works of William Shakespeare.

“The fool thinks they are wise, but the wise person knows themselves to be a fool. Modest doubt is the beacon of the wise. There are more things in heaven and earth than are dreamed of in your philosophy.”

“Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none. Notice how far the little candle throws its beams! So shines a good and kind deed in this weary world.”

“There are some who say that to love thyself is a sin, but it is not so great a one as to neglect thyself.”

“Virtue is bold, goodness is never fearful — while no legacy is so rich as honesty. To be an honest friend, as this world goes, is like one picked out of ten thousand.”

“Be not afraid of greatness. Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and others have greatness thrust upon them. But all know this: to do a great right, we must often do a little wrong.”

“Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind. And therefore is the winged Cupid painted blind. They who do not love are those who do not show their love.”

“There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. It is not the stars that hold our destiny, but ourselves.”

“Cowards die many times before their deaths. But the valiant never taste of death but once. Of all the wonders that I yet have heard, it seems to me most strange that people should fear death, seeing that death is a necessary end, and will come when it comes.”

The Law of Attraction | Truth vs. Nonsense

August 9, 2018
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Listen to episode 290 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Law of Attraction | Truth vs. Nonsense. Adapted from the book Dynamic Thought by Henry Thomas Hamblin, published in 1914.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. A special thanks to James Allan for becoming our newest monthly patron. If you would like to join James in becoming a patron, you can do so for a little a dollar month. To learn more about the special rewards our patrons receive, please visit LivingHour.org/patron. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from Dynamic Thought by Henry Thomas Hamblin, published in 1914.

There has been a lot of nonsense written and spoken about the Law of Attraction. People have been taught that all they need to do is to adopt a certain mental attitude, think thoughts of success and abundance, and then sit and wait for the abundance of all good things to drop from the skies at their feet. The folly of it is seen when we find that these teachers of "abundance" and "opulence" have to work for a living — by teaching the very thing which, if true, would save them from all the necessity of working.

Suppose that it were true; then what is possible for one would be possible for all, and if all adopted this method of getting a living, then who would till the soil or make our clothes? Would everything we need come from the skies? Even if this were true (and we could draw all that we needed by the power of thought from the blue vault of heaven), then no one would have anything to do; life would become stagnant; and the race would perish from inaction.

Life IS action — and if a person ceases to work, they at once begin to disintegrate, and soon require six feet of earth wherein to cover their bones. When business people retire they often quickly die, and those who (being born with riches) have no necessity to work for a living, STILL have to find some kind of work and interest, in order to prevent themselves from mental and physical decay.

There is no such thing as getting something for nothing. The principle of the "square deal" runs right through life and the Universe. A business person who tries to get something for nothing — who, in other words, fails to give value for money — finally finds themselves without a customer.

Overcoming Troubles & Difficulties | Henry Thomas Hamblin

August 7, 2018
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Listen to episode 289 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Overcoming Troubles & Difficulties. Adapted from the book The Power of Thought by Henry Thomas Hamblin.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Don’t forget to follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, or to leave us a review at the iTunes store. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from The Power of Thought by Henry Thomas Hamblin, published in 1924.

WHY is thinking right thoughts so important? It’s important because it influences our actions. It’s important because it builds up character and a steadfast mind. It’s important because upon it our well-being and the success of our whole life depend. It’s important because it is by right thought that we can overcome harmful suggestion.

First of all, we have to realize that thought is the cause of our actions and decisions. It is largely because of this that our circumstances depend upon our thoughts. If, for instance, we do not overcome life's difficulties in our thoughts, then we can never overcome them in actual experience. By this I mean that our difficulties must be boldly met and conquered in thought, if ever we are to hope to overcome them in reality.

In a way, it is good advice to tell people not to dwell upon their woes but to think of pleasant things instead — however, it is liable to lead to a habit of thought almost as destructive as brooding over trouble. This negative application of what is meant to be good advice is responsible for the failure of those who say, “I have tried right- thinking, but it makes no difference.” The reason “it makes no difference” is that it is not right-thinking at all, but actually a form of wrong-thinking.

Such people say, “I never indulge in wrong thoughts about my troubles. I refuse to think about them.” Just so, and it is there where the whole trouble lies. Instead of life's troubles being met boldly and conquered in thought, they run away from them. As soon as the mind comes up against an unpleasant thought — the thought of an irksome duty that must be done or of a crisis that must be faced, or of a difficulty that has to be overcome — the mind dodges it and moves on to something more pleasant.

Fate vs. Free Will | Defying Astrology & Circumstance

August 2, 2018
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Listen to episode 288 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Fate vs. Free Will | Defying Astrology & Circumstance. Adapted from the book Within You is the Power by Henry Thomas Hamblin, published in 1920.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Get notified of new episodes each week by subscribing to us at the iTunes store, Google Play, or your favorite podcast player. And if you have a spare moment, please do leave us a review. I always enjoy hearing from listeners who have been helped by our podcast. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from Within You is the Power by Henry Thomas Hamblin, published in 1920.

Great has been the controversy in the past, over the vexing subject of fate versus free-will. On the one hand, fatalists claim that we are so closely bound to the wheel of fate it is impossible for us to live our lives in any different way than that which is mapped out for us. They can bring a quantity of first-class evidence in support of their claim and believe in their theory with all their heart. On the other hand, the advocates of free-will believe just as whole-heartedly that we are not bound at all, being as free as air. They, too, can bring plenty of evidence in support of their theory, which confirms to them in their belief.

Each school of thought thinks that the other is wrong, yet they cannot both be wrong! Let us therefore examine the subject for ourselves, for it is an important one, being intimately connected with the manner in which we live our lives. First of all, let it be said that they are both wrong, in part, and both right, in part. Humanity is bound to the wheel, yet, at the same time, we have free-will. Let us, therefore, explain this seeming paradox.

It is an ancient truth of mystical teaching that the human being, when it is unevolved and before it is "unfolded," is bound to the wheel of fate very closely. The unevolved human being follows its base desires, thus creating for itself a future from which it cannot escape. When however, we become more evolved and emancipated, we begins to resist following our base desires and strive, instead, to follow higher things. This creates for us a better future and thus we become free in comparison with our former slave state.

We are a slave to fate as long as we are a slave to our base desires. We are, however, free to overcome lower things and thus rise to higher. When we do this, we cease to create a painful future for ourselves and thus become free.

The Art of Life & Living | Ella Wheeler Wilcox

July 31, 2018
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Listen to episode 287 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Art of Life. Adapted from the book The Art of Being Alive by Ella Wheeler Wilcox.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Today I would like to reach back a couple years to one of our earliest podcasts, and one of my personal favorites. It’s a reading from Ella Wheeler Wilcox, and an essay that is included in our book Evergreen: 50 Inspirational Life Lessons. You can purchase Evergreen now in e-book and get our 2nd book Everest: 50 Motivational Life Lessons for free. To buy your copy, please visit InspirationalLifeLessons.com. Thank you.

LIFE means action, from the cradle to the grave. There are limitless possibilities in this life to bring into realization whatever hopes or aspirations we desire. If we only but begin…

There is no such thing as inaction during this life. We are continually going forward or backward. You are either stronger or weaker this year than you were last year. You are braver or more cowardly. You are more hopeful or more pessimistic. You are more capable mentally or less so. You have better or poorer command of your forces. You have more efficiency or not as much. You are nearer your goal or farther from it. You are a better human being or not as good. Next year at this time, you will be farther onward or farther backward.

Every thought, every word, and every act of each day is chiseling out the statue you are making of yourself. If you desire to be an expression of the universe’s finest handiwork, you must work with care. Delicate tools are these thoughts of ours, and they must be used with caution.

Every morning say to yourself: "Today I will think of whatever is beautiful, strong, noble, wholesome, and worthy. I will entertain hope, courage, reverence, gratitude, and love as the guests of my heart. I will make thoughts of health at ease in the guest-chamber of my mind, so disease may not enter. I will achieve something worthwhile in my chosen field of endeavor. I will work faithfully, but I will find time to sit alone with thoughts of the universe for a little while, and no worldly ambition or anxiety shall intrude upon that time."

Building Foundations for a Life Worthwhile | Motivational

July 26, 2018
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Listen to episode 286 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Building Foundations for a Life Worthwhile. Edited and adapted from The Keys to Success by B.C. Forbes.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast, brought to you by the kind financial support of listeners like you. To become our patron for as little as a dollar a month, please visit LivingHour.org/patron. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from The Keys to Success by B.C. Forbes, published in 1918.

Personality is the sum of what you are. Personality means character— plus. Many persons have a good character, but a personality signifies something other than honesty, truthfulness, industry, and the like. It embodies all these and something more. Personality implies pleasing, winning ways, graciousness, heartiness, enthusiasm, magnetism.

To have a gracious personality we must cultivate graciousness. To have a personality that radiates the right qualities, we must possess the right qualities. We cannot wear the right kind of personality and be the wrong kind of person. We may indeed have brilliant talents and un-selfish natures, and yet fail to cultivate or exhibit the kind of personality that inspires love and admiration.

Personality may be defined as the right kind of character in the right kind of wrapper. The workshop, the office, the university, and the world have no dearth of men and women of education: people of technical skill, professionals of full-measure ability. But there is a dearth of people possessing these qualifications plus personality. And what the workshop, the office, the classroom and the world needs is just such women and men. It is worthwhile striving to become one of them.

A friend of mine once sent me a series of 11 words as his “Key to Success.” You will notice that the initial letters of each word spell Personality. They are: Persistence, Enthusiasm, Respectful, Systematic, Original, Natural, Alert, Loyal, Imaginative, Truthful, and Youthful. If you want to build up a strong, enduring worthwhile life, you must lay the right kind of foundations such as these.

Success Through Self-Reliance | How to Succeed

July 24, 2018
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Listen to episode 285 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Success Through Self-Reliance | How to Succeed. Edited and adapted from The Keys to Success by B.C. Forbes.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. We’ve had such a positive response to our MAJESTY meditation and e-books promotion that I’ve decided to extend the special until the end of the month. To get our Majesty meditation, plus the e-book Evergreen: 50 Inspirational Life Lessons, plus the e-book Everest: 50 Motivational Life Lessons, all for the one low price of $9.99, please visit LivingHour.org/majesty. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from The Keys to Success by B. C. Forbes, published in 1918.

Without self-reliance no one can succeed in the largest way. Self-reliance breeds courage, faith, determination, never-say-dieness. Self-reliance inspires a person to do the best that is in them. Without self-reliance, the difficulties that are common to forging ahead cannot be fought and overmatched.

Self-reliance is a well-spring of hope and inspiration and courage. It strengthens the will, the brain, the arm. It is as a strong pole by which you can vault over obstacles. Lose self-reliance, and you become weak, wobbly, vacillating. You balk at even the shadow of difficulty. Admit the danger of defeat, and you are already half defeated.

Archimedes is credited with the declaration: "Give me a lever of sufficient length and a fulcrum to rest it upon, and I would move the world." Our modern Archimedes sets about making the needed lever and fulcrum. They do not wait to have something handed to them: they go after it, and either finds it or makes it.

If you have no faith, no reliance in yourself, how can you expect others to place faith or reliance in you? Aim high and you may hit high. Aim low and you are little likely to hit high. Don't be a Uriah Heep. Strive rather to cultivate something of the Napoleonic mind — Napoleon not only had self-faith, but he inspired among others such confidence that his presence at a battle was accounted to be worth a hundred thousand men.

The Secret of Harmonious Living | Inspirational Life Hacks

July 19, 2018
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Listen to episode 284 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Secret of Harmonious Living | Life Hacks. Edited and adapted from Success Through Thought Habit by Benjamin Johnson.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Occasionally people feel that study of the best gurus will give them what they need, and they seek wildly for the self-development books they think may help them. One such person, who had read many pages of good advice but had failed to improve, went to one of the greatest teachers in the self-help field and said, "I have spent days and weeks fighting against of all sorts of bad habits and I have resisted temptation as hard as I can, but I still find it harder all the time to be better.

The teacher smiled and said, "The reason for your trouble is very clear; you really have been thinking so much of what you wanted to avoid that you have been concentrating on your bad habits rather than your good ones. Now, for a time, just stop weeding your mental garden and affirm Harmony as hard as you can." "But," objected the young person, "what can I study that will help me?" And the teacher replied, "Study Harmony. Eat it, think it, drink it, sing it, breathe it, whistle it---fill your mind with it the last thing at night and the first thing in the morning. And, last but not least, demonstrate it in every action."

Friends who watched this young person’s progress spoke of it as remarkable, and that the person’s ability became phenomenal, with a smile that was the most winning they had ever known. When this individual became one of the most successful business people in the town, many called the person lucky--for they did not know of the many hours and days and weeks that this person had spent cultivating the Harmony Habit from which they were now but reaping the reward.

Integrity & Self-Respect | Building Your Personal Brand

July 17, 2018
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Listen to episode 283 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Integrity & Self-Respect | Building Your Personal Brand. Edited and adapted from The Keys to Success by B.C. Forbes.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast, brought to you by the kind financial support of listeners like you. Learn how you can support our podcast for as little as a dollar a month by visiting LivingHour.org/patron. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from Keys to Success by B.C. Forbes, published in 1918.

A person may lose their earthly all, yet if they retain their self-respect, they can still be rich in the things that count, the things that endure, the things worthwhile. The individual who loses their self-respect (though they may have millions) is poor indeed, a bankrupt, a failure.

Self-respect is one of the basic ingredients that go to make success. If we lose respect for ourselves, we will sooner or later lose the respect of others. Self-respect is not pride. It is not haughtiness. It is that hard-to-define "something" which prevents us from stooping to meanness, pettiness, harshness, bossiness; which resents every form of unfairness; which rebels against injustice; which compels us to have scrupulous regard for the rights and feelings of others.

The self-respecting person cannot flout the self-respect of others, cannot do unto others what they would resent having done to themselves — for they who wound the self-respect of another thereby mar and scar their own self-respect.

But self-respect is not a quality apart. It is not a flower that can be cultivated in a garden overgrown with weeds. It is a virtue that can flourish only in the company of other virtues. The person who cheats, the one whose business is not run honestly, the person whose daily object is to get the better of others, cannot retain the true brand of self-respect.

Such people may strive to convince others — they may even try to delude themselves — that they are entitled to self-respect, and they may, and probably will, demand that others, particularly their subordinates, show them scrupulous "respect" (for those who pose are the greatest sticklers for insisting upon being shown deference). But at heart they will know, or at least suspect, that they are bluffing, that their character does not ring true, that they are not worthy of being shown the respect which they demand of those they lead.

Make Your Life Count | Motivational Speeches

July 12, 2018
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Listen to episode 282 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Make Your Life Count | Motivational Speeches. Edited and adapted from “Ambition and Success” by Orison Swett Marden.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. If you are a regular listener of this podcast, you’ve probably heard me mention our MAJESTY meditation program. If you’ve thought about purchasing the meditation, but have yet to do so — now is the time to finally give the program a try. To celebrate my birthday tomorrow, I am now offering the MAJESTY meditation + our e-book Evergreen (50 Inspirational Life Lessons) + our e-book Everest (50 Motivational Life Lessons) all for the one low price of $9.99.

In other words, you’re getting $20 worth of free e-books with your purchase of the MAJESTY meditation. To take advantage of this limited-time special offer and begin building a fresh, new positive mindset, visit LivingHour.org/Majesty. Thank you. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from Ambition and Success, by Orison Swett Marden, published in 1919.

Everywhere we see men and women doing the lower, the commoner things, seemingly satisfied to do them all their lives, when they have the ability to do the higher. Many people do not start out with ambition enough to spur them to do big things. They make a large career practically impossible at the very outset, because they expect so little of themselves. They have a narrow, stingy view of life and of themselves which limits their ambition to a little, rutty, repetitive groove.

If I could give you but one word of advice, it would be that which Michelangelo wrote under a diminutive figure on a canvas in Raphael’s studio, when he called on the artist and found him out: “Amplius” (which is the Latin word for “larger”). Raphael needed no more advice. This one word meant volumes to him.

I advise every one of you to frame this motto, hang it up in your room, in your store, in your office, in the factory where you work, where it will stare at you in the face. Constant contemplation of it will make your life broader and deeper. A fine ambition will steady your life. It will hold you to your task; keep you from yielding to the hundred temptations that might ruin you.

What chaos there would be but for a person’s ambition to get up and get on in the world and to improve their condition. Nothing so strengthens the mind and enlarges the horizon of achievement as a constant effort to measure up to a worthy ambition. It stretches the thought, as it were, to a larger measure, and directs the life to finer things.

Health & Success Through Will Power | Motivation Essays

July 10, 2018
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Listen to episode 281 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Health & Success Through Will Power. Edited and adapted from “How to Develop Your Will Power” by Clare Tree Major.

Motivational Podcasts: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Last week I announced the release of our Ocean Sounds Sleep Meditation with Positive Affirmations. We now have added a variation of that meditation, with gentle rain replacing the ocean sounds — giving you two different meditation sounds to choose from. Pick up your copy for the special sale price of $4.99, by visiting LivingHour.org/ocean. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from How to Develop Your Will Power by Clare Tree Major, published in 1920.

THE human Will may be termed your power to direct your own actions. You are the master of your own destiny when you yourself, the Self, holds the reins.

However, you have three forces to conquer — three forces which must serve you or destroy you. You must control your physical, emotional, and mental attributes. These are your tools, the forces with which you must work to draw from the world the experience you need to make your life complete. Now, what these experiences may be, each person will decide for themselves, but there is but one driving force, the controlling Will.

As a child, the tremendous soul which the world knew as Theodore Roosevelt found itself in a frail, delicate body absolutely incapable of demonstrating the characteristics of its owner. But this same soul refused to inhabit a frail, delicate body as a man, and by sheer persistent will power, built up for itself a physical personality so superior to that of the average man that to mention Roosevelt’s name brings to mind immediately a physical magnetism and power so dominating as to seem a fitting representation of the great man that he proved himself to be.

Roosevelt radiated energy, the energy of dominant WILL. You should think of Will as a force in itself — as really nothing but a force. It is pure energy. It does not choose your way of life (your reason, or intellect, does that). It does not desire things (your inclinations, or preferences, present to your mind for choice the things which cause desire).

Your Will is purely the energy which you use to make these selected desires become your own property. It is the power which the Self (you) sets in motion to obtain that which your intellect and desire approve as the thing you should have.

Positive Affirmations | Ocean Sounds Sleep Meditation

July 5, 2018
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Listen to episode 280 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Positive Affirmations | Ocean Sounds Sleep Meditation. Edited and adapted from Peace, Power & Plenty by Orison Swett Marden.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. For the past several months, a number of listeners have reached out, asking if we could put together a sleep meditation with positive affirmations. I’m happy to announce that this new meditation is now available.

The recording includes soothing ocean waves that I recorded off the Gulf of Siam, and a soft binaural beat track to enhance the mind’s receptivity of the affirmations — all of which will help usher you into a deep, restful sleep, while encouraging creative dreaming to solve problems, inspire new ideas, and build a positive mindset.

We are offering the new meditation for the special sale price of only $4.99. But that promotional price will only be offered for a limited time. Get your copy of the meditation today by visiting LivingHour.org/ocean. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from Peace, Power, and Plenty by Orison Swett Marden, published in 1909.

The miracles of civilization have been performed by men and women of great self-confidence, people who had unwavering faith in their power to accomplish the tasks they undertook. The human race would be centuries behind what it is today had it not been for their grit, their determination, their persistence in finding and making real the thing they believed in, and which the world often denounced as chimerical or impossible.

There is no law by which you can achieve success in anything, without expecting it, demanding it, assuming it. There must be a strong, firm self-faith first, or the thing will never come. There is no room for chance in God's world of system and supreme order.

Everything must have not only a cause, but a sufficient cause — a cause as large as the result. A stream cannot rise higher than its source. A great success must have a great source in expectation, in self-confidence, and in persistent endeavor to attain it. No matter how great the ability, how large the genius, or how splendid the education, the achievement will never rise higher than the confidence.

You can if who think you can, and you can't if you think you can't. This is an inexorable, indisputable law. It does not matter what other people think of you, of your plans, or of your aims. No matter if they call you a visionary, a crank, or a dreamer, you must believe in yourself.

Rules of Civility & Civil Discourse | George Washington

July 3, 2018
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Listen to episode 279 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Rules of Civility & Civil Discourse. Edited and adapted from the writings of George Washington.

Inspirational Podcast Transcript: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. I’d like to start today with a special thank you our newest patrons: Kevin Steele, Javier Rivera, Martin Nyoike, and Jacob McWherter. If you would like to help support our podcast and get access to free transcripts and the series Our Sunday Talks, visit LivingHour.org/patron. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from 110 Rules of Civility & Decent Behavior, which was written by a 16 year old George Washington, and believed to be based on rules of behavior composed by the French Jesuits in 1595.

Play not the Peacock, looking everywhere about you, to See if people are noticing your dress or virtues.

Let your Conversation be without Malice or Envy. And in all situations where Passions run hot, seek to cool and govern them with Reason.

When a person does their Best and fails, do not Criticize them. Do not Blame them for trying.

When you must give Advice or Criticism, consider the timing, and whether it should be given in public or private. Also consider the Manner in which you give it. Above all be gentle.

If you are Corrected, take the correction without Argument. If you are Wrongly judged, correct it later.

Take all Admonitions thankfully at the Time or Place they are given. If the Warning proves Unwarranted, choose a later, more convenient Time, to let the person know.

Do not Make Fun of anything that is Important to others. If you say anything Witty or Humorous, refrain from Laughing at your own joke.

If you Criticize someone else of something, make sure you are not Guilty of it yourself. Actions speak louder than words.

Use no Disparaging Language against anyone, nor ever Curse or Revile them.

Do not be quick to believe Bad Reports about other people.

Do not show yourself glad at the Misfortune of another person, even if they are your Enemy.

Do not go where you are not Wanted. Give not Advice without being Asked; and when desired, do it briefly.

The Soul of a River | Inspirational Nature Essays

June 28, 2018
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Listen to episode 278 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Soul of a River. Edited and adapted from “Little Rivers” by Henry van Dyke.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Get the best of our podcast in hardcover or e-book by visiting our book website InspirationalLifeLessons.com.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from the book “Little Rivers” by Henry van Dyke, published in 1895.

A river is the most human of all inanimate things — and the one most capable of offering companionship. It has a life, a character, a voice of its own, and is as full of good fellowship as a sugar-maple is of sap. It can talk in various tones, loud or low — and of many subjects, grave and joyful.

Under favorable circumstances, it will even sing — not in a fashion that can be reduced to notes and set down on a sheet of paper, but in a vague, refreshing manner, and to a wandering air that goes: "Over the hills and far away…"

For real company and friendship, there is nothing outside of the animal kingdom that is comparable to a river. I will admit that a very good case can be made in favor of some other objects of Nature. For example, a fair argument has been made by those who have fallen in love with the sea. But that is a formless and disquieting passion. It lacks solid comfort and mutual confidence. The sea is too big for loving, and too uncertain. It will not fit into our thoughts. It has no personality, because it has so many. It is, in many ways, a salty abstraction.

There is also a love for the Mountains, which is more satisfying because they are more individual. It is possible to feel a very strong attachment for a certain mountain range whose outline has grown familiar to our eyes — or a clear peak that has looked down, day after day, upon our joys and sorrows, moderating our passions with its calm aspect. We come back from our travels, and the sight of a well-known mountain is like meeting an old friend unchanged. But it is a one-sided affection. The mountain is voiceless and self-possessed. And its very loftiness and serenity sometimes make us the more lonely.

How to Cultivate Courage | Mastering Fear & Anxiety

June 26, 2018
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Listen to episode 277 of the Inspirational Living podcast: How to Cultivate Courage | Mastering Fear & Anxiety. Edited and adapted from “Thoughts Are Things” by Prentice Mulford.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: COURAGE and presence of mind mean the same thing — for presence of mind implies command of mind. Cowardice and lack of mental control also mean about the same thing — for cowardice is rooted in hurry, the habit of hurry or lack of repose.

All degrees of success are based on courage — mental or physical. All degrees of failure are based on timidity. You can cultivate courage and increase it at every minute and hour of the day.

You can have the satisfaction of knowing that in everything you do, you have accomplished two things — namely, the doing of the thing itself and (by the manner of its doing), adding eternally to yourself another atom of the quality of courage. You can do this by the cultivation of deliberation — deliberation of speech, of walk, of writing, of eating — deliberation in everything.

There is always a bit of fear when there is a bit of hurry. When you hurry to the airport, you are in fear that you may be left behind, and with that comes fear of other possibilities resulting from that. When you hurry to work, or a meeting, or an appointment, you are in fear of some negative consequence of not being on time....

Today's podcast is sponsored by Audible, which has an unrivalled collection of audiobooks by both contemporary and classic authors. Take advantage of a 30 day trial membership + 1 free audiobook by visiting: https://audible.com/inspirational.

Writers on Writing | Authors and Literature | Careers

June 21, 2018
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Listen to episode 276 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Writers on Writing | Authors and Literature. Edited and adapted from “Campfires & Guideposts” by Henry van Dyke.

Inspirational Podcasts Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. A special thanks to our newest patrons, Steve Crews, Wayne Sanday, and Naima Shea. If you would like to support our podcast and gain access to full transcripts of our more than 270 podcasts, please visit LivingHour.org/patron. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from Campfires & Guideposts by Henry Van Dyke, published in 1921.

IT is a curious fact that there is no good guide book to authorship. There are, of course, lots of self-portraits of authors at work. And there are many essays upon the craft of writing in general.

The best of these portraits and advice are excellent reading, full of entertainment and instruction for the alert and candid mind, and touched with a special, sympathetic interest for those young persons who have sternly resolved, or fondly dreamed, that they will follow a literary career.

A volume of carefully selected material of this kind might be made attractive and rewarding to readers who wish to be authors. But the one thing which such a book ought not to be mistaken for, is a manual for the profession of writing literature.

Why not? Well, the answer is an open secret — an instructive paradox. Because there is no certain pathway to authorship. It is a voyage, if you like. But there are no guideposts in the sea. It is a flight, if you like. But there are no tracks in the air. It is certainly not a journey along a railway line, or a highway, or even a well-marked trail.

In this it differs from other vocations like the Bar, Engineering, Medicine, or Accounting. For each of these there is a pretty clearly defined path of preparatory study, with fixed gateways of examination along its course. When the last gate is passed and the young doctor is licensed to practice, the young lawyer admitted to the bar, the accountant certified to crunch numbers, the path broadens into a road, which leads from one professional duty to another with the regularity of a time-table — and, it must be added, with something of the monotony of a clock.

Death & Eternal Life | Spirituality Life Lessons

June 19, 2018
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Listen to episode 275 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Death & Eternal Life | Spirituality Life Lessons. Edited and adapted from “On the Threshold” by Charles Wagner.

Spirituality Podcast Transcript: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast, brought to you with the kind financial support of listeners like you. Support our podcast for as little as 1 dollar a month. Learn more at LivingHour.org/patron. Thank you. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from On Life’s Threshold by Charles Wagner, published in 1905.

SOME people think it is better never to speak of death, or even consider it. I know parents who have tried to hide it from their children, carefully avoiding any encounter that might reveal it to them. This is one of those desperate feats that serve only to make more formidable what we are obliged to look at sometime in the face.

Death comes without any care on our part. Its manifestations are part of the daily spectacle of nature and of human society. We need not look at a corpse or a coffin to see it, for to note only an insect or animal falling lifeless is to have our attention directed to that mysterious Something called death.

Of course we should not spend our whole life watching for its end. That would be the worst way to prepare for it. Students who spend their school hours thinking about recess are poor workers, as are those employees occupied all day long in counting the minutes that separate them from the evening.

Like them, we lose our time when we spend it in fruitless contemplation of death. We are here to live — not to waste time in mournful preoccupations and to have our souls dulled by constant thoughts of the last hour.

It is not a bad idea, of course, to become familiar with the fact that we shall not stay forever on the earth, and I do not think it necessary to wait for old age to consider death. Indeed, it is well to consider it while we are young. The person who thinks at times that their days are numbered is disposed to utilize them better.

The thought of death makes us a better human being. We watch more scrupulously our conduct toward friends and family, thinking that perhaps we will not always have them with us.

The Spirit of Family | Coming Home | Life & Traditions

June 14, 2018
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Listen to episode 274 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Spirit of Family | Coming Home | Life & Traditions. Edited and adapted from “By the Fireside” by Charles Wagner.

Inspirational Podcast Transcript: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. If you have benefited from this podcast, please let me know by leaving us a review at the iTunes store, Google Play, or Stitcher.com. Your reviews are greatly appreciated and help others find our podcast. Thank you. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from By the Fireside, by Charles Wagner, published in 1901.

Let us talk today about the home, whose very name is so full of suggestion and memories. The roof is primarily a shelter. Cold and heat, all the inclemencies of sky, urge us to build it and protect it. The person who lacks this refuge lacks everything — and to picture in a word the degree of want, we say of a person that they are homeless. Would we have, on the contrary, a perfect picture of the happiness of civilized life, we may find it in a family circle — unbroken, old and young together, under the protecting roof, round a cheerful fire, where the evening meal is bubbling in a great pot.

But the roof is something besides a shelter. It is a center of stability. If we had no need of it for cover and defense, we would still feel driven to find somewhere in the world a corner of our own — to attach ourselves to some familiar spot. True, life is a journey, and we are all on a pilgrimage. But every one of us is in search of a home.

The most intrepid traveler, the most indefatigable explorer, cannot exist and be always on the road. When distance has lost its enchantment, and our passion for adventure has cooled, when we have braved dangers and looked upon wonders, desire wakens in our heart to find a resting-place. The more countries and peoples and things we have seen, the greater becomes our thirst for a fixed abode, for the peace and the affections of a home. The Wandering Jew himself sighs for but one thing: to make a halt, and that forever.

A sure refuge, a rallying-point whither all our ways lead us back — that is what I call the roof-tree, the true abiding home. It is one of the material forms in which our spiritual nature manifests and interprets itself. Humanity has need of creating a world in its own image, so that we are better able to live fruitfully — and our dwelling place is this world in miniature.

The Courage to Be | Charles Wagner Life Lessons

June 12, 2018
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Listen to episode 273 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Courage to Be | Charles Wagner Life Lessons. Edited and adapted from “Courage” by Charles Wagner.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. One of the keys to more successful living is the ability to control our thoughts and emotions, and to keep our mind filled with uplifting thoughts. That’s where The Majesty Program comes in. Our powerful affirmations meditation uses our unique Autosuggestion Sound Method to help you transform your life in 30 days.

To learn more, please visit: LivingHour.org/Majesty. To get 30% off your purchase, use the coupon code: inspiration. Now, on to today’s reading, which was edited and adapted from the book Courage by Charles Wagner, published in 1903.

These lines are not written for any particular class of people. I seek to speak of those things which are common to all, being day by day more convinced that the nature of humanity is everywhere identical. However, I have not been able to avoid thinking more especially of those whose morning is gloomy and whose youth was hard.

Goethe declares in his history of his life that "what we desire in our youth we possess abundantly in our old age." An astonishing saying, and one which seems inconsistent with truth; but if we look at it more closely, such is not the case. We do, indeed, apply ourselves with ardor to the pursuit of that which we desire; and, whether our ambition be noble or the reverse, it is seldom that we do not end by fulfilling it, in part at least.

Our life is eventually stamped by our ideal. No one, therefore, can watch the tendency of their desires too carefully. What we most often lack in youth is the knowledge of what it is wisest to desire. To wish for vain things is to take a will-o'-the-wisp for our guide along the road. How many of us have wandered in this way after these uncertain lanterns of light, which promised happiness but led us into the swamps.

I should like to make you desire the things that are real, that are worth being loved and acquired by stress and toil; and among all these things there is nothing to be compared with force. Force is itself a virtue; and by virtue I understand every power that excites in us an intenser life, and joy, and hope.

Becoming Self-Actualized | The Power to Live Abundantly

June 7, 2018
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Listen to episode 272 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Self-Actualization | The Power to Live Abundantly. Edited and adapted from “How to Develop Your Will Power” by Clare Tree Major.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Visit our lifestyle brand Book of Zen for inspirational t-shirts, hoodies, I-phone cases, and more. Go to BookofZen.com to view our latest offerings. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from “How to Develop Your Will Power” by Clare Tree Major, published in 1920.

THE most dominant demand of the human mind is for success. Just what may be success (and in what particular field success is desired) varies with the individual. But the fundamental need is the same: the attainment of the highest standard of accomplishment possible to each specific personality.

Success may mean money, business power, social position, artistic excellence, literary achievement, or any other one of a thousand obvious and general goals of ambition — or it may mean some simple acquirement of domestic or personal value only. Whatever it may be, small or large, which furnishes the inspiration, the force of out-reaching energy has its source in one and the same basic principle — the absolute need of the inner you, the real individual, for self-realization. The vehicle for this self-realization is the WILL.

The use of the term “self–development” in connection with this is that it’s the process through which the hidden power of the individual is revealed. You are yourself, a part of the creative force of life, not the thing which has been created. Hereafter when I speak of the individual, or when you speak of yourself, let us think of the inhabiting, controlling intelligence, the self which owns and has made your body what it is, the soul which is making its pilgrimage through this wonderful world, to learn by conquering to become master of itself, and through that mastery, to become master of all that is.

Positive Thoughts | The Building Blocks of Success

June 5, 2018
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Listen to episode 271 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Positive Thoughts | The Building Blocks of Success. Edited and adapted from “Success Through Thought Habit” by Benjamin Johnson.

Motivational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. A special thanks to all you who subscribed to our YouTube Channel last month. We hit our goal of 1000 total subscribers and I’m grateful for your support.

If you haven’t subscribed to our YouTube Channel yet, you can do so by visiting LivingHour.org/youtube. Or by just going to YouTube and searching for the Inspirational Living podcast. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from “Success Through Thought Habit” by Benjamin Johnson, published in 1908.

Long, long years ago, so the story is told,

A maiden named Doubt, loved young Courage so bold.

Their marriage was blessed by four children, it’s said,

And each parent named two, at least, so I've read.

The first was called Will and the second was Wont,

The third was named Do and the fourth one was Dont.

Like sturdy young plants they flourished and grew,

And astonished their friends by the things they would do.

Young Will was a wonder at work or at play,

He was busy as could be, while Wont sat all day,

Objecting, complaining, his face sad and long,

Declaring to his mind this world was all wrong.

Do pushed right ahead, leaving nothing undone,

But Dont was a mule and often balked just for fun.

So they grew and developed until one fine day,

They attempted to find what the world had to say.

Do soon found an opening and rose to success,

Dont couldn't find work and thus failed to progress.

Will forged straight ahead and was known far and wide,

Wont kept right on balking and balked till he died.

The moral is plain for those who can see,

It consists in a warning to heed carefully,

About the names you use and the names you wear,

If you wish to succeed and escape from the snare

Of failure and poverty, sickness and woe,

And be sure of enjoyment wherever you go.

Know that thought is your guide, for your name merely proves

What kind of ideas have lodged in the grooves

Of your mind, the one place you should ever be sure,

To keep peaceful, harmonious, joyous and pure.

Gratitude Life Lessons | Facing the Ungrateful

May 31, 2018
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Listen to episode 270 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Gratitude Life Lessons | Overcoming Ingratitude. Edited and adapted from “The Power of Truth” by William George Jordan.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Get full transcripts of our podcast, with your very own private podcast feed, by becoming our patron today. Learn more at LivingHour.org/patron. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from “The Power of Truth” by William George Jordan, published in 1902.

Gratitude is being thankful, and then turning that feeling into action. It is the instinctive radiation of justice — giving new life and energy to the individual from whom it emanates. It is the heart's recognition of kindness that the lips cannot repay.

Gratitude never counts its payments. It realizes that no debt of kindness can ever be outlawed, ever be cancelled, ever paid in full. Gratitude ever feels the insignificance of its instalments — ingratitude the nothingness of the debt.

Gratitude is the flowering of the seed of kindness. Ingratitude is the dead inactivity of a seed dropped on a stone. The expectation of gratitude is human, while rising superior to ingratitude is almost divine. To desire recognition of our acts of kindness, and to hunger for appreciation and a return of good for good, is natural. But we never rise to the dignity of true living until we have the courage that dares to face ingratitude calmly, and to pursue our course unchanged when our good works meet with thanklessness or disdain.

A person should have only one court of appeals as to their actions — not "What will be the result?" or "How will it be received?" but "Is it right?" Then you should live your life in harmony with this standard alone — serenely, bravely, loyally, and unfalteringly — making "right for right's sake" both your ideal and your inspiration.

We should be like the great sun itself, which ever radiates light, warmth, life, and power, because it cannot help doing so, because these qualities fill the heart of the sun — and for it to have them means that it must give them constantly. Let the sunlight of our sympathy, tenderness, love, appreciation, influence, and kindness ever go out from us as a glow to brighten and hearten others.

The Secret of Health, Youth, and Courage

May 29, 2018
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Listen to episode 269 of the Inspirational Living podcast: The Secret of Health, Youth & Courage. Edited and adapted from A Gentle Heart by James Russell Miller.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt:Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Get the best of our podcasts in book form by visiting our website InspirationalLifeLessons.com. Today’s reading was edited and adapted from The Blessing of Cheerfulness by James Russell Miller, published in 1895.

I have already shared with you the ways in which the lesson of cheerfulness can be learned. It is a lesson that we should learn, whatever the cost. The person who carries about with them a cheerful spirit is a blessing wherever they go.

We have no right to go among people with our complaints and our mumblings. It is part of the debt of love we owe to our fellow human beings, to bring them always the best we have — not gloom and shadow and discouragement, but cheer, hope, and joy.

We were made to be lights in the world, to let our light so shine before others that they may see our good works, and glorify the sublime. There is no light in discontent, complaining, and gloom; and we are not realizing God's plan for our life when we let shadows hang about us.

The blessings of cheerfulness are many. It blesses the individual themselves. It is a fountain of life in your heart. It makes you strong for all duty and struggle. Life is not half so hard for the cheerful person, as it is for the one who is depressed and unhappy. Burdens are light when you can sing under them. Battles are easily won when the heart is glad.

Literary Life Lessons from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

May 24, 2018
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Listen to episode 268 of the Inspirational Living podcast: Literary Life Lessons from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Edited and adapted from The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe.

Inspirational Podcast Excerpt: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. I’d like to thank all of you who’ve taken the time to subscribe to our YouTube channel. I’m only about 45 people short of my goal of 1000 subscribers by the end of the month.

So, if you would like to help me out and subscribe, please visit LivingHour.org/youtube. Or simply go to YouTube, search for the Inspirational Living podcast, and click the subscribe button. Thank you.

Today’s reading was edited and adapted from The Maxims and Reflections of Goethe. Translated by T. Bailey Saunders, and published in 1906.

THERE is nothing worth thinking but it has been thought before; we must only try to think it again. In the works of humankind, as in those of nature, it is really the motive which is chiefly worth our attention.

How can you come to know yourself? Never by thinking, but only by doing. Try to do your duty, and you will know at once what you are worth. But what is your duty? The claims of the day.

Tell me with whom you associate, and I will tell you who you are. If I know what your business is, I know what can be made of you.

Every person must think after their own fashion — for on your own path you find a truth, or a kind of truth, which helps you through life. But you must not give yourself free rein; you must control yourself. Mere naked instinct does not become you. Unbridled activity, of whatever kind, leads at last to bankruptcy.

In Botany there is a species of plants called Incomplete; and just in the same way, it can be said that there are people who are incomplete and imperfect. They are those whose desires and struggles are out of proportion to their actions and achievements. The most insignificant person can be complete if they work within the limits of their capacities (innate or acquired). But even fine talents can be obscured and destroyed by lack of this indispensable requirement of symmetry.

It is only men and women of practical ability, knowing their powers and using them with moderation and prudence, who will be successful in worldly affairs. It is a great error to take yourself for more than you are — or for less than you are worth.