Inspirational Living: Life Lessons for Success & Happiness

A Life Worthwhile Pt. 2 | Inspiring Graduation Speeches

December 27, 2018

Listen to episode 330 of the Inspirational Living Podcast: A Life Worthwhile Pt.2 | Inspiring Graduation Speeches. Edited and adapted from “What is Worth While?” by Anna Robertson Brown. A special sample episode from our patron series Our Sunday Talks.

Inspirational Podcast Transcript: Welcome to the Inspirational Living podcast. Today’s reading is a continuation of our last podcast, which was edited and adapted from What is Worth While by Anna Robertson Brown, and an episode from Our Sunday Talks, a series we offer exclusively to our patrons. Learn how you can become a patron by visiting LivingHour.org/patron.

Pretense, worry, discontent, and self-seeking — these are the things that we may let go. Now, what are the things in life that are worthwhile? — that we should lay hold of, keep, guard, and use? It is worthwhile to be wise in the use of time. In the eternal life there is no waste of years. It is with time that we purchase every- thing that life has of good. It is by the wise use of time that we make ourselves competent for eternity.

The most reckless spendthrift in the world is the one who squanders time. Money lost may be regained, friendships broken may be renewed, houses and lands may be sold or buried or burnt, but then may be bought or gained or built again. But what power can restore the moment that has passed, the day whose sun has set, the year that has gone?

It awes me when I think of it, that there was a time when you and I were not — when the cycles of eternity swept onward and the stars turned in their courses without the sight or sound of humankind. But now there can never come a time when you and I shall not be. The vast gift of eternity has been laid in your hands and mine — an eternity not wholly to come, but one which is even now here. Shall we not use its hours aright?

The question of life is not, “How much time have we?” — for in each day, each of us has exactly the same amount: we have "all there is." The question is, “What shall we do with it?” Shall we let this priceless gift slip away from us in haphazard deeds, or shall we adopt some plan of saving, and of systematic doing, in our lives? What shall this plan be? How shall we determine what things are worth giving time to? Let us think about this question.